Policies and Procedures

We take our responsibility to provide the highest quality baby parrots seriously. We pay particular attention to the genetic background, and mental and physical health of each baby we produce.

WE SELL BABIES

We do not allow babies to leave the nursery until they are feathered, have a competent immune system, and are flying for one week.

Information Provided with Babies

All unweaned babies will come complete with comprehensive handfeeding and weaning information.

Handfeeding Information
Weaning Information

At the time a deposit is placed on a baby, written instructions will be supplied to the new owner. It is expected that the new parent will carefully read this information as soon as possible. Between the time of deposit and taking the baby home, the parent is expected to visit the baby in the nursery, observe the baby being fed, and ask questions. During the week before the baby goes home, the information should be carefully re-read. After the baby goes home, we will be available to answer questions at any hour of the day.

Weaned vs. Unweaned Babies

At Hartman Aviary, we like to see baby parrots in the hands of someone who can give them great deal of attention at the same stage their wild cousins are leaving the nest. For the average size parrot, like an African Grey or an Amazon, this is about 8 to 10 weeks old. The first 30 to 60 days after a baby begins to peak out of the safety of the nest is the most important time of its life. During this relatively short period of time a parrot has to learn many things to insure his chance of survival. That little brain is programmed to build neuropathways at the fastest rate in all of his life. These neuropathways can only develop as a response to environmental stimulus.

The first 30 to 60 days after leaving the nest a parrot has to learn language, how to avoid predators, forage for food, parrot body language, flock etiquette, fly and a host of other behaviors that can only be properly learned during the appropriate developmental phase of the brain. Parrots learn so fast that, by the time an average parrot like an african grey is 4 months old, he has developed 75% of all of the neuropathways he will get in his life.

This is the same stage of life a human experiences at two and three years of age. The "terrible twos" are when we are a learning sponge, getting into everything and trying the patience of everyone. For survival reasons this stage happen much sooner in parrots.

There is no way a breeder can spend the amount of time necessary to expose multiple baby parrots to the tremendous amount of situations necessary to get the maximum brain development. All areas of the brain have to be developed areas of the brain have to be developed during their optimal development time frame for each part of the brain. Individual areas of the brain cannot be properly developed out of sequence or once their window of opportunity has passed.

Breeders that keep their babies until they are weaned do not understand the sequential development of the neuropathways of the avian brain. They assume that a healthy friendly baby can become a healthy friendly adult. I doubt that any of these same breeders would allow their children to be raised in a sterile nursery with a limited number of caregivers until they were 5 or 6 years old; which is the same stage of development as most weaning parrots.

A baby raised without a great deal of tactile and mental stimulation generally develops into a low-functioning adult. Don't be fooled by the "I raise great babies" statement. You want to know what kind of adults they raise.

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Guarantee-Refund-Return

Products

Your satisfaction is guaranteed. If you have a problem with your order for any reason, give us a call. Returns are accepted up to 30 days after purchase for all products except The Aviator Harness. For the safety of your birds, we do not accept harness returns. Other items may be returned as long as they are unopened and the packages are in resalable condition. Thank you for understanding.

Babies

All of our babies are hatched here at Hartman Aviary. We do not buy babies from other breeders. We have control over the babies all of their life and are able to continually assess their health. Our babies are guaranteed to be free of congenital and pathogenic diseases when they leave the nursery.

We have sold thousands of babies without significant problems. In over 20 years we have not yet had a case of viral infection reported in one of our babies. For this reason, we do not utilize any of the available vaccines. Vaccines are available from your veterinarian for any babies that will be living in high-risk exposure situations.

Many types of normally occurring bacteria and fungus are found throughout our nursery and your home. These bacteria and fungus are ingested and inhaled by baby birds, and us, continually. Sometimes this normal bacteria and fungus will show up on tests your veterinarian may perform. Often, the numbers of these potential pathogens will increase slightly during stress related events like moving to a new home. Low levels, without symptoms of illness, are not to be considered a disease.

The most likely time frame for a baby parrot to become ill is 2 to 5 days after it arrives at its new home. Healthy babies exposed to new and different bacteria and fungus may become ill for the same reason humans may become ill when traveling. After approximately one week a healthy baby's immune system will have developed the ability to deal with these new bacteria and fungus.

There is no specific time limit to this guarantee. We understand situations can arise where time will pass between symptoms and a definitive diagnosis can be made. Any baby that is shown to have become ill from congenital defects or an illness, present while the baby is in our nursery, will be replaced at our expense.

Hartman Aviary's veterinarian will decide all disputed claims after examining the bird. When it is not possible to examine the bird, our veterinarian will utilize veterinary diagnosis and supporting lab work to make a decision.
Veterinary Management at Hartman Aviary.

Deposits for Babies

Once we have a live baby a 25% deposit will be required. Individuals on the waiting list for a fertile egg are encouraged to send a check for deposit prior to hatching. This check will not be deposited until the baby is three days old and will be destroyed or returned if we cannot supply the baby. By having the deposit on hand you can avoid the hassle of getting thedeposit to us within five days. After five days the baby will go to the next person on the list.

Refunds for Babies

Deposits on live babies may not be refunded. Once we commit the baby to you, we may pass up other potential buyers. If the baby has another buyer by the time he was scheduled to go to your home, the deposit will be refunded. Under some circumstances, a deposit may be applied to a different baby.

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Privacy Policy

Your Home and Email Addresses
Your privacy is very important to The Parrot University, LLC. We do not sell or exchange names or any other information about our customers with third parties. We will occasionally send notices of special events, sales and hatch announcements to our customers email address.

Credit card information
Credit card information never enters our web site. It will only go to J.P Morgan Chase Bank via a secured network using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption technology. We use this SSL technology to prevent such information from being intercepted and read as it is transmitted over the Internet. The encrypted data goes to a secure site where your information is stored on restricted-access computers located at restricted-access sites. While we make every effort to ensure the integrity and security of our network and systems, we cannot guarantee that our security measures will prevent third-party "hackers" from illegally obtaining this information.

This site is 100% owned by The Parrot University, LLC. We are not hosted by a third party like Yahoo that will collect and reuse your information for other purposes.

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Purchase Policies

Waiting List

There is no charge for putting your name on the waiting list for a particular species. When we have fertile eggs, we will call to make sure you want the baby if it hatches. If you say yes, we expect you to buy the baby.

Deposits

Once we have a live baby a 25% deposit will be required. Individuals on the waiting list for a fertile egg are encouraged to send a check for deposit prior to hatching. This check will not be deposited until the baby is three days old and will be destroyed or returned if we cannot supply the baby. By having the deposit on hand you can avoid the hassle of getting the deposit to us within five days. After five days the baby will go to the next person on the list.

Refunds

Deposits on live babies may not be refunded. Once we commit the baby to you, we may pass up other potential buyers. If the baby has another buyer by the time he was scheduled to go to your home, the deposit will be refunded. Under some circumstances, a deposit may be applied to a different baby.

Late Pick-up of Babies

A charge of not less than $3.00 per day will be assessed for boarding babies not picked up during a reasonable time window.

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Payment

We accept Cash, Check, Most Credit Cards, Paypal, Money Orders and Cashier's check.

There may be a currency exchange fee for non US Dollar payments.

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Bird Fairs and Other Exhibitions

No babies from Hartman Aviary will ever be seen at a "Bird Fair." We will never expose your baby to the stress and disease possibilities associated with bird shows.

Many of the vendors at bird marts or shows are hobbyists and not professionals. They are often not aware of the problem that can develop by placing a baby parrot in this environment. Here are a few of the many reasons to consider:

  1. Prior to weaning, babies can require 18 to 20 hours of uninterrupted sleep each day.

  2. There are many parrots of questionable origin at these shows. Some of these birds change hands many times and are exposed to diseases along the way.

  3. Young birds cannot handle the tremendous amount of noise and activity at these shows and will experience considerable stress.

  4. Young birds do not have a competent immune system until they are at least 7 weeks old. Prior to having a competent immune system, babies are prone to infections by all of those normal, opportunistic bacteria and funguses that we are exposed to every day.

  5. Babies taken to a show and returned to the nursery then expose all of the other babies in the nursery to all of the diseases they might have come in contact with. A healthy older baby that is not as susceptible to diseases can infect the nursery while they are mounting an immune response.

  6. Money, one of the most bio-contaminated items we have, is constantly handled by breeders feeding and handling babies.

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Parrot Rescue

Hartman Aviary is not a parrot rescue facility. We are however always looking for good pets that need to find a great home. If you find it necessary to rehome your African Grey Parrot or Double Yellow Head Amazon due to a personal life change and are looking for the best home possible, we may be the answer. Contact us so you may visit our facilities and see the opportunites.

We will also consider rare birds that need to be breed to maintain a genetic pool, For more information review the section on selective breeding.

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Hours of Operation

The Parrot University

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Saturday Open House

After 32 years Hartman Aviary has decided to cut back on our schedule and discontinue the Saturday Open House. 

 

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Selective Breeding

All personality traits have some basis in genetics. Until recently Biologist and Psychologists believed that personality was based 10% on genetics (nature), and 90% our upbringing and education (nurture). With the recent development of gene mapping scientist now know that at least 50% of personality is genetic based, and their best guess it that we will eventually find that genetics is responsible for 60% of personality. This means that about half of the personality of your pet bird will be determined by its genetic background.

This situation can be summed up with this phrase: Genes dictate the roads we can take, not the roads we will take. Unfortunately if there is no road it cannot be taken.

The environmental stimuli we receive, that helps develop our personality, use our genetics as a foundation. If none of our genes are coded for being nice, and all are coded for being aggressive, then no matter how hard we try, we can only be mean. This is an extreme example but makes the point. In most cases, all animals have genes for good and bad development of most personality traits. At Hartman Aviary we try to stack the deck in our favor by selecting breeding stock that has more desirable than undesirable genes for each trait.

No matter how hard we try, it is never possible to provide exactly the right stimulus at the right time to optimally develop our personalities. We recognize that this is a fact of life and select proper breeding stock to minimize the potential down side.

There are a few behavior traits that are easy to identify. When we see birds that we know have a genetic predisposition to develop these undesirable behaviors, we do not breed them. The most obvious undesirable traits include aggression and feather mutilation.

Consider this: Most breeders breed parrots that had to be given up by their owners. The reasons are usually because of aggression, excessive noise, feather mutilation or excessive egg laying. All four of these behaviors are the result of a genetic predisposition for the behavior and are not a behavior you would choose to deal with. Breeders are usually quick to qualify the behavior as a result of poor housing conditions, or abuse. Unfortunately the genetics behind these behaviors are often passed on to the next generation, the one you are taking home.

Some breeders suggest that if genetics is only half of the equation that even bad genetics can be turned around. The opposite is actually the case.

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